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March 27, 2020 | NPR · Parents have been circulating ideas for how to keep kids happy — or at least occupied — during this time of social isolation due to COVID-19. Our Arts Desk has some heart-felt suggestions to offer.
 
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January 25, 2011

Looking into Hospital Infection Rates, Part 1

Every year tens of thousands of Coloradans who go to the hospital to get healed actually get sicker. They get infections as a result of their medical care. An unknown number of those people die. Hospitals don’t have to make their infection rates public, except for a handful of procedures. The state health department publishes an annual report with that information, in part to help consumers pick the safest hospitals. This year’s report has just been released, and KCFR Health Reporter Eric Whitney got some expert help deciphering it. In the first of two stories on hospital infections, he found that consumers would be hard pressed to get a clear picture of hospital safety from the state’s infection report alone.

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Filed under: Eric Whitney,Health — andrea @ 8:50 am

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