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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Scientists at the Smithsonian are set to unpack something rare that the National Museum of Natural History has never had before — a nearly complete skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus rex.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · In 2005, a group of anonymous donors in Kalamazoo launched a bold program. It pays for graduates of the city's public schools to attend any of Michigan's public universities or community colleges.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A flood protection authority is suing to try to hold the oil and gas industries responsible for Louisiana's land crisis. But policymakers are trying to stop the lawsuit, saying it's bad for business.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

Art & Life from NPR

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · The racism Gandhi encountered in South Africa helped spark a lifetime of activism. Historian Ramachandra Guha says without that experience, "he would never have become a political animal."
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · This cooking method — a strange mix of the precise and the forgiving — means never having to worry about rubbery, overcooked meats. But mind your eyebrows while you're holding the blowtorch.
 
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April 15, 2014 | NPR · For the past decade Pakistan has faced war, political instability and the rise of religious extremism. But those crises have fueled a new generation of Pakistani writers and artists.
 
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April 15, 2014 | NPR · Even 2,000 years ago, people seemed to know that the egg could be a source of life. And an ancient art form has been passed down, transforming a symbolic source of food into a dazzling decoration.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · The cable network premieres a new drama series tonight. It's called Fargo, and has the same title as the 1996 Coen Brothers movie. Critic David Bianculli says it's very definitely a wonderful show in that same wacky spirit – but it's just as important to note what this new Fargo is not. It's not a remake — and it's not a sequel.
 

February 10, 2011

Film Production as Economic Development

Movies like How the West Was Won starring Henry Fonda and Gregory Peck, the original True Grit with John Wayne, and Sleeper with Woody Allen and Diane Keaton have given places like Canon City, Denver, Durango, and Bent’s Old Fort near LaJunta visibility on the silver screen. But as other areas began offering large incentives, Colorado’s desirability seemed to fade into the background. KRCC’s Andrea Chalfin examines the current state of on-location shoots in Colorado, and how one county is looking to the film industry as part of its economic future.

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This piece aired as part of the February edition of Western Skies. See a slideshow and some video shot in Crowley County by clicking here.

Filed under: Andrea Chalfin,Arts & Culture,KRCC News — andrea @ 7:33 am

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