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March 3, 2015 | NPR · The game Charles Darrow sold in the 1930s bore a striking resemblance to a game Lizzie Magie patented in 1904. In The Monopolists, Mary Pilon tells Monopoly's origin story.
 

February 16, 2011

Schools Brace for Budget Cuts

Public schools will likely bear the biggest brunt of the cuts if the Governor’s budget is approved by the legislature. Those cuts come at a time when many traditionally under-performing Colorado schools are starting to win praise for turning things around. From Rocky Mountain Community Radio member station KUNC, Kirk Siegler reports.

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Filed under: Children & Youth,Colorado,Education,Kirk Siegler,KRCC News,RMCR — andrea @ 8:22 am

2 Comments »

  1. Can someone explain to me why the money being made off of medical marijuana can’t be used to avoid such budget cuts?

    Comment by Liz — February 16, 2011 @ 8:27 am

  2. Liz, from our statehouse correspondent, Bente Birkeland:

    They already have swept money from the medical marijuana cash fund, and a surplus in dollars. A rough figure of that dollar amount is about 10 million dollars or so, but the budget shortfall is 1.3 billion dollars.

    Comment by andrea — February 16, 2011 @ 9:19 am

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