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Current News from NPR

June 2, 2020 | NPR · From Minneapolis, to New York, to smaller cities such as Omaha, Neb., outrage over police brutality and systemic racism spills into the streets.
 
Reuteres
June 2, 2020 | NPR · Here are some of the most illuminating stories that we've read this week about the uprisings across the nation, and what brought the country to this moment.
 
AP
June 2, 2020 | NPR · In a Rose Garden address and on a conference call with governors on Monday, the president threatened to send troops to states that didn't crack down sufficiently on demonstrations.
 
AP
June 2, 2020 | NPR · Iowa Rep. Steve King faces a strong GOP primary challenger, after years of incendiary comments put him on the outs with his party. Eight states and the District of Columbia vote on Tuesday.
 
Getty Images
June 2, 2020 | NPR · In the days since George Floyd was killed while in police custody in Minnesota, sports figures have started speaking out, too. Some even joined the demonstrations that have swept the nation.
 

Art & Life from NPR

June 1, 2020 | FA · Critic David Bianculli recommends the BBC Shakespeare plays, now available on Britbox. He's also been previewing HBO Max, a new streaming service, and the PBS documentary, An Accidental Studio.
 
Riverhead Books
June 1, 2020 | FA · Brit Bennett's new novel centers on two light-skinned African American sisters — one of whom "passes" for white. The Vanishing Half is compelling — if somewhat melodramatic.
 
Getty Images
May 31, 2020 | NPR · The artist known for major outdoor art installations that often involved wrapping buildings and elements of nature in fabric died at his home in New York City on Sunday.
 
Random House Children's Books
May 31, 2020 | NPR · Before he became an astrophysicist, Ray Jayawardhana was just a kid, looking up at the night sky with his father. "I remember being awed," he says. He's written a book called Child of the Universe.
 
NPR
May 31, 2020 | NPR · An NPR photojournalist's grandfather's 90th birthday party, canceled due to COVID-19, inspired a poem — and his vow to stay 89.
 

February 9, 2011

Rainbow Falls, Graffiti Art, and “Graffiti Falls”

Rainbow Falls lies along Fountain Creek above Manitou Springs, but because of visits by people with spray paint, many have come to know it by a different name: Graffiti Falls. KRCC’s Kate Jonuska set out to explore efforts to clean up the area, and discovered what some see as art, others see as vandalism.

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This piece aired as part of the February edition of Western Skies. See a slideshow by clicking here.

May 3, 2010

Cultural Services and the City Budget

After budget shortfalls and a failed ballot initiative in Colorado Springs, cultural services found itself on the chopping block. That means the Pioneers’ Museum, Rock Ledge Ranch, and other facilities and programs were facing closure. KRCC’s Kate Jonuska recently checked in with the museum and the ranch to see how they’re faring.

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Filed under: Arts & Culture,Colorado Springs,Economy,Kate Jonuska,KRCC News — Andrea Chalfin News Dir. @ 7:49 pm

April 22, 2010

E-cycling in the Pikes Peak Region

With Earth Day today, many communities around the Pikes Peak region are beginning celebrations and events tied to environmentalism. KRCC’s Kate Jonuska previews one event coming up in Colorado Springs that seeks to inspire a little spring-cleaning.

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Filed under: Environment,Kate Jonuska,KRCC News,Uncategorized — Andrea Chalfin News Dir. @ 5:10 pm

March 19, 2010

Examining the Census

Most people know by now that the country is beginning its national head-count, known as the census. The word “census” comes from Latin, and the head-count idea dates back to the Roman Empire. These days, every ten years, questionnaires show up in mailboxes in order to help provide a statistical picture of the country. KRCC’s Kate Jonuska takes a look at the history, politics, and present state of the census.

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Click below to hear the full conversation about the census with Colorado College Political Science Professors Andrew Dunham and Bob Loevy (about 50 minutes).

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For more information regarding the 2010 Census, the government’s website is here.

Filed under: Kate Jonuska,KRCC News,Uncategorized — Andrea Chalfin News Dir. @ 7:35 am